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Schramm Virtual Speaker Series-Geology Underfoot: Rocks of Schramm Park and Global Connections

When:
August 6, 2020 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
2020-08-06T19:00:00-05:00
2020-08-06T20:00:00-05:00
Where:
On-line
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Amber Schiltz-Outdooe Education Specialist
402-332-5022

Schramm Education Center is happy to continue our speaker series by going virtual! Join the virtual webinar to learn more about fascinating topics such as rare mammals of Nebraska, or the science behind the geological features found at Schramm. Both webinars will be held on a Thursday evening at 7pm central time. The series is free, however registration is required to attend. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with more information for the event. Then on the day and time of the event, use this link and the password from your email to join us!

AUGUST 6 | 7PM – 8PM (Central Time)

Geology Underfoot: Rocks of Schramm Park and Global Connections

Dr. David Harwood

Professor & Research Scientist, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

Register at– https://outdoornebraska.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMrc-yrrTwvEtW3pUC8D2kor7fPjpqP3znl

Rocks that outcrop at Schramm Park record a snapshot in geological time when the Nebraska was connected to the global ocean across a shallow sea to the west, but still some distance from the high and rising Appalachian Mountains to the east. This presentation will make connections between modern ice ages, and how the patterns of rocks at Schramm Park can help understand how ice sheets in the south polar region ~300 million years ago controlled sea level changes and past global climate. This past history guides our understanding of modern and future ice sheet behavior and the dynamic nature of our planet.

About the Speaker

David Harwood is a Professor and T.M. Stout Chair in Stratigraphy in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His research in Antarctic geology centers on interpreting past changes in polar ice sheets to learn about past and future climate changes. He has been to Antarctica more than 15 times, leading research teams from small tent-based geological camps to large international drilling programs like the ANDRILL (Antarctic Geological Drilling) Program. He frequently talks to school groups who visit Schramm Park and is committed to enhancing public understanding of our dynamic planet.